• Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building Modernization
  • Exposed Chilled Beams in Shell Space in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Solar Thermal Collectors on Roof of Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Thermal Storage Tank in Basement of Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Lounge in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Public Space in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Gallery/Security in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • First-floor Office in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Training Room in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Café in Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • Cooling Towers on Roof of Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building
  • U.S. General Services Administration

    Denver, Colorado

    Currently home to 11 federal agencies, the Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building in downtown Denver was targeted by its owner, the U.S. General Services Administration, for an extensive modernization project to significantly improve energy efficiency and deliver state-of-the-art updates to this important example of 1960s-era Federal architecture. This design-build project involved comprehensive upgrades to all major building systems housed within the 18-story, 494,000 SF office tower and minor improvements to the adjacent courthouse. The upgrades are projected to reduce energy use in the office tower by almost 70 percent over current levels. In addition to improving building envelope insulation, some of the most significant energy savings were achieved by implementing a chilled-beam system to replace the building’s inefficient and inflexible mechanical system. A chilled-beam system is a cutting-edge method to move heating and cooling around the building with very little wasted energy. It primarily uses moderate temperature water (an extremely efficient heating/cooling medium) to condition building spaces. After capturing heat generated in the building by occupants, computers, lighting, and solar gain, a thermal tank located in the basement stores and circulates this heat through the building’s chilled beam system as needed. The retrofitted building features many other energy-saving technologies including 100% LED lighting, enhanced daylighting, and solar thermal collectors on the roof to provide all of the building’s domestic hot water. Water-conserving strategies are anticipated to decrease water usage by 40%. The RMH Group served as the project’s mechanical/electrical/plumbing engineer.
 

Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building Modernization

U.S. General Services Administration

Denver, Colorado

Currently home to 11 federal agencies, the Byron G. Rogers Federal Office Building in downtown Denver was targeted by its owner, the U.S. General Services Administration, for an extensive modernization project to significantly improve energy efficiency and deliver state-of-the-art updates to this important example of 1960s-era Federal architecture. This design-build project involved comprehensive upgrades to all major building systems housed within the 18-story, 494,000 SF office tower and minor improvements to the adjacent courthouse. The upgrades are projected to reduce energy use in the office tower by almost 70 percent over current levels.

In addition to improving building envelope insulation, some of the most significant energy savings were achieved by implementing a chilled-beam system to replace the building’s inefficient and inflexible mechanical system. A chilled-beam system is a cutting-edge method to move heating and cooling around the building with very little wasted energy. It primarily uses moderate temperature water (an extremely efficient heating/cooling medium) to condition building spaces. After capturing heat generated in the building by occupants, computers, lighting, and solar gain, a thermal tank located in the basement stores and circulates this heat through the building’s chilled beam system as needed.

The retrofitted building features many other energy-saving technologies including 100% LED lighting, enhanced daylighting, and solar thermal collectors on the roof to provide all of the building’s domestic hot water. Water-conserving strategies are anticipated to decrease water usage by 40%.

The RMH Group served as the project’s mechanical/electrical/plumbing engineer.

LEED Status

Certified LEED-NC Gold

Awards

Engineering News-Record/ENR Mountain States, 2014 Best Projects, Government/Public Buildings (2014)