• General Services Administration

    Denver, Colorado

    Opened in 1965, the 248,000 SF Byron G. Rogers U.S. Courthouse is a prominent structure in downtown Denver’s Federal District and is home to the Federal District Court, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Attorney’s and U.S. Marshal’s offices. The five-story courthouse underwent a major rehabilitation−including a total mechanical, electrical, and lighting overhaul−to modernize systems and make the building more sustainable. A variety of strategies were applied throughout the facility to improve lighting quality and energy efficiency. Most lighting is by fluorescent electronic ballasts with T-8 and T-5 lamps. All-elec­tronic dimming ballasts are capable of lower­ing lighting output to just ten percent of full. Photocell controls are used in conjunction with electronic fluo­rescent stepped-level lighting to save energy in daylit areas, such as lobbies and judges’ chambers. Occupancy sensors are used to control the lighting in non-daylit private offices. Where practicable, day­lighting pro­vides for required ambient illumination. Fluores­cent lighting luminaires within the daylit spaces use stepped-level ballasts connected to pho­tocell controls to allow for maximum daylight utili­zation and minimal electric light usage. The centerpiece of the lighting design is for the courtrooms, where an elegant and dignified envi­ronment is a must. Linear, indirect, wall-mounted fluorescent fixtures were installed for the well area, with additional fluorescent ambient lighting incorporated within architec­tural ceiling elements. Each courtroom has programmable dim­ming system, and halogen downlights and wall­washers are used for task and video lighting.
 

Byron G. Rogers U.S. Courthouse Renovation

General Services Administration

Denver, Colorado

Opened in 1965, the 248,000 SF Byron G. Rogers U.S. Courthouse is a prominent structure in downtown Denver’s Federal District and is home to the Federal District Court, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Attorney’s and U.S. Marshal’s offices. The five-story courthouse underwent a major rehabilitation−including a total mechanical, electrical, and lighting overhaul−to modernize systems and make the building more sustainable.

A variety of strategies were applied throughout the facility to improve lighting quality and energy efficiency. Most lighting is by fluorescent electronic ballasts with T-8 and T-5 lamps. All-elec­tronic dimming ballasts are capable of lower­ing lighting output to just ten percent of full. Photocell controls are used in conjunction with electronic fluo­rescent stepped-level lighting to save energy in daylit areas, such as lobbies and judges’ chambers. Occupancy sensors are used to control the lighting in non-daylit private offices. Where practicable, day­lighting pro­vides for required ambient illumination. Fluores­cent lighting luminaires within the daylit spaces use stepped-level ballasts connected to pho­tocell controls to allow for maximum daylight utili­zation and minimal electric light usage.

The centerpiece of the lighting design is for the courtrooms, where an elegant and dignified envi­ronment is a must. Linear, indirect, wall-mounted fluorescent fixtures were installed for the well area, with additional fluorescent ambient lighting incorporated within architec­tural ceiling elements. Each courtroom has programmable dim­ming system, and halogen downlights and wall­washers are used for task and video lighting.

Certifications Certified LEED-EB Gold

Awards

GSA Environmental Award, 2007