• Dinosaur National Monument Quarry Exhibit Hall CFD Model Output
  • Dinosaur National Monument Quarry Exhibit Hall CFD Model Output
  • Dinosaur National Monument Quarry Exhibit Hall CFD Model Output
  • National Park Service

    Dinosaur National Monument, Utah

    Opened in 1958, the Upper Quarry Visitor Center was built to shelter an exposed cliff face containing nearly 2,000 dinosaur bones from the late-Jurassic period. The facility, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has been closed since 2006 due to structural problems caused by the unstable nature of the soil on which the building resides. Since the visitor center would need to be closed to the public during the time required to shore up the structural integrity of the facility, the National Park Service decided it would be an opportune time to concurrently renovate the exhibit hall containing the cliff face to be more energy efficient and comfortable for visitors and staff. The unique shape of the exhibit hall is one of the primary reasons the visitor center is on the National Register of Historic Places. Since the exhibit hall has an atypical profile, airflows through the space could not be accurately and reliability predicted through conventional means. RMH’s engineers took advantage of the facility’s unique shape and worked to simulate projected airflow using various HVAC strategies through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Modeling the unique characteristics of the existing facility led to the design for combined energy-efficient direct evaporative cooling with thermal displacement ventilation (TDV) distribution. Direct evaporative cooling takes advantage of northeastern Utah’s dry climate to provide low-energy cooling while bringing plenty of fresh outside air into the building. Thermal displacement ventilation is a non-mixing air distribution strategy in which incoming air originates near the floor level and rises due to thermal buoyancy to exhaust louvers near the roof structure. Energy consumption is conserved by only conditioning the lower occupied areas of a zone, and air quality is improved since ventilation effectiveness is nearly 100%. Without RMH’s complex CFD modeling simulations, it would have been extremely difficult to determine if a combined direct evaporative cooling/displacement ventilation system would be an effective and reliable means to cool and ventilate the exhibit hall. RMH’s sophisticated CFD model not only confirmed the efficacy of this type of system, it also helped fine-tune the system to optimize performance.
 

Dinosaur National Monument, Quarry Exhibit Hall Renovation

National Park Service

Dinosaur National Monument, Utah

Opened in 1958, the Upper Quarry Visitor Center was built to shelter an exposed cliff face containing nearly 2,000 dinosaur bones from the late-Jurassic period. The facility, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has been closed since 2006 due to structural problems caused by the unstable nature of the soil on which the building resides. Since the visitor center would need to be closed to the public during the time required to shore up the structural integrity of the facility, the National Park Service decided it would be an opportune time to concurrently renovate the exhibit hall containing the cliff face to be more energy efficient and comfortable for visitors and staff.

The unique shape of the exhibit hall is one of the primary reasons the visitor center is on the National Register of Historic Places. Since the exhibit hall has an atypical profile, airflows through the space could not be accurately and reliability predicted through conventional means. RMH’s engineers took advantage of the facility’s unique shape and worked to simulate projected airflow using various HVAC strategies through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Modeling the unique characteristics of the existing facility led to the design for combined energy-efficient direct evaporative cooling with thermal displacement ventilation (TDV) distribution. Direct evaporative cooling takes advantage of northeastern Utah’s dry climate to provide low-energy cooling while bringing plenty of fresh outside air into the building. Thermal displacement ventilation is a non-mixing air distribution strategy in which incoming air originates near the floor level and rises due to thermal buoyancy to exhaust louvers near the roof structure. Energy consumption is conserved by only conditioning the lower occupied areas of a zone, and air quality is improved since ventilation effectiveness is nearly 100%. Without RMH’s complex CFD modeling simulations, it would have been extremely difficult to determine if a combined direct evaporative cooling/displacement ventilation system would be an effective and reliable means to cool and ventilate the exhibit hall. RMH’s sophisticated CFD model not only confirmed the efficacy of this type of system, it also helped fine-tune the system to optimize performance.