• Whiskeytown NRA, Oak Bottom Water Tank Replacement
  • National Park Service

    Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, California

    To provide visitors and staff of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area with a reliable source of potable water, the National Park Service needs to distribute untreated water from a local reservoir to an on-site water filtration plant located downstream. From the reservoir, water is first pumped into storage tanks to allow precise control and flow of the water on an as-needed basis to the water filtration plant. Whiskeytown’s existing 60,000-gallon water storage tank needed to be replaced due to the tank’s age/condition and increasing demand for potable water. The RMH Group designed the electrical and communications systems necessary to precisely monitor and control storage and distribution of water to and from two new 53,000-gallon water storage tanks, which replaced the existing 60,000-gallon-tank. RMH’s sophisticated design included provisions for ultrasonic water-level monitoring, direct communication between the storage tanks and the water filtration plant via a radio-based telemetry system, and tank-mounted photovoltaic panels to generate power for the equipment required by these remotely located tanks.
 

Oak Bottom Water Tank Replacement

National Park Service

Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, California

To provide visitors and staff of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area with a reliable source of potable water, the National Park Service needs to distribute untreated water from a local reservoir to an on-site water filtration plant located downstream. From the reservoir, water is first pumped into storage tanks to allow precise control and flow of the water on an as-needed basis to the water filtration plant.

Whiskeytown’s existing 60,000-gallon water storage tank needed to be replaced due to the tank’s age/condition and increasing demand for potable water. The RMH Group designed the electrical and communications systems necessary to precisely monitor and control storage and distribution of water to and from two new 53,000-gallon water storage tanks, which replaced the existing 60,000-gallon-tank. RMH’s sophisticated design included provisions for ultrasonic water-level monitoring, direct communication between the storage tanks and the water filtration plant via a radio-based telemetry system, and tank-mounted photovoltaic panels to generate power for the equipment required by these remotely located tanks.