• NIST Hydrogen Test Facility
  • NIST Hydrogen Test Facility
  • CFD Model Output of NIST Hydrogen Test Facility
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Boulder, Colorado

    NIST’s new hydrogen test facility serves as a national center for research in the development of hydrogen fuel infrastructure. NIST initiated construction of the laboratory primarily to develop strength and durability tests for hydrogen pipeline materials. Constructing safe, reliable, and financially practical pipelines across great distances will be key to determining whether hydrogen can serve as a viable, long-term alterative fuel source. The facility is comprised of two hydrogen test chambers, one of which is the nation’s largest. Two control rooms were built to monitor and control research activities. One control room is adjacent to the primary test chamber via a blast wall, while the second control room is located in a nearby building to remotely oversee the most potentially hazardous tests. Since hydrogen is a volatile gas, explosion-proof HVAC equipment and electronics were specified to minimize any potential for accidental combustion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was utilized to predict and depict movement of various gases throughout the lab.
 

NIST Hydrogen Test Facility

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Boulder, Colorado

NIST’s new hydrogen test facility serves as a national center for research in the development of hydrogen fuel infrastructure. NIST initiated construction of the laboratory primarily to develop strength and durability tests for hydrogen pipeline materials. Constructing safe, reliable, and financially practical pipelines across great distances will be key to determining whether hydrogen can serve as a viable, long-term alterative fuel source.

The facility is comprised of two hydrogen test chambers, one of which is the nation’s largest. Two control rooms were built to monitor and control research activities. One control room is adjacent to the primary test chamber via a blast wall, while the second control room is located in a nearby building to remotely oversee the most potentially hazardous tests. Since hydrogen is a volatile gas, explosion-proof HVAC equipment and electronics were specified to minimize any potential for accidental combustion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was utilized to predict and depict movement of various gases throughout the lab.

Awards

Mountain States Construction, Gold Hard Hat Award, Engineering Design Category, 2009