• Quarry Exhibit Hall Renovation
  • Quarry Exhibit Hall Renovation
  • Quarry Exhibit Hall Renovation
  • National Park Service

    Dinosaur National Monument, Utah

    Opened in 1958, the Quarry Exhibit Hall was built to shelter an exposed cliff face containing nearly 2,000 dinosaur bones from the late-Jurassic period. The unique shape of the exhibit hall is one of the primary reasons the visitor center is on the National Register of Historic Places. Since the exhibit hall has an atypical profile, airflows through the space could not be accurately and reliability predicted through conventional means. RMH’s engineers performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to simulate projected airflow to optimize the HVAC system of the uniquely shaped facility. Modeling the unique characteristics of the existing facility led to the design for combined energy-efficient direct evaporative cooling with thermal displacement ventilation (TDV) distribution. Direct evaporative cooling takes advantage of northeastern Utah’s dry climate to provide low-energy cooling while bringing plenty of fresh outside air into the building. With thermal displacement ventilation, energy is conserved by only conditioning the lower occupied areas of a zone, and air quality is improved since ventilation effectiveness is nearly 100%. RMH developed computer-generated daylighting models to complement its mechanical/electrical engineering services and to provide valuable information to the project’s architect. Using data produced from the modeling, team members were able to develop a renovation strategy that would provide sufficient levels of daylight to enter the building for visibility, while rejecting troublesome glare. A window glazing scheme was also selected that will reduce HVAC cooling loads in the spring/summer months and reduce heating loads in fall/winter months. The lighting/daylighting control scheme−utilizing photocells, occupancy sensors, and a timeclock with relay panel−was implemented to turn off supplemental electrical lighting when sufficient ambient daylight is available or when the building is unoccupied. RMH’s lighting design featured efficient fluorescent lighting with metal halide highlights to emphasize depth and minimize shadows. The resulting space is more energy efficient than before and provide a greater level of comfort for building occupants, all while protecting and preserving treasured artifacts.  
 

Dinosaur National Monument, Quarry Exhibit Hall Renovation

National Park Service

Dinosaur National Monument, Utah

Opened in 1958, the Quarry Exhibit Hall was built to shelter an exposed cliff face containing nearly 2,000 dinosaur bones from the late-Jurassic period. The unique shape of the exhibit hall is one of the primary reasons the visitor center is on the National Register of Historic Places. Since the exhibit hall has an atypical profile, airflows through the space could not be accurately and reliability predicted through conventional means. RMH’s engineers performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to simulate projected airflow to optimize the HVAC system of the uniquely shaped facility. Modeling the unique characteristics of the existing facility led to the design for combined energy-efficient direct evaporative cooling with thermal displacement ventilation (TDV) distribution. Direct evaporative cooling takes advantage of northeastern Utah’s dry climate to provide low-energy cooling while bringing plenty of fresh outside air into the building. With thermal displacement ventilation, energy is conserved by only conditioning the lower occupied areas of a zone, and air quality is improved since ventilation effectiveness is nearly 100%.

RMH developed computer-generated daylighting models to complement its mechanical/electrical engineering services and to provide valuable information to the project’s architect. Using data produced from the modeling, team members were able to develop a renovation strategy that would provide sufficient levels of daylight to enter the building for visibility, while rejecting troublesome glare. A window glazing scheme was also selected that will reduce HVAC cooling loads in the spring/summer months and reduce heating loads in fall/winter months.

The lighting/daylighting control scheme−utilizing photocells, occupancy sensors, and a timeclock with relay panel−was implemented to turn off supplemental electrical lighting when sufficient ambient daylight is available or when the building is unoccupied. RMH’s lighting design featured efficient fluorescent lighting with metal halide highlights to emphasize depth and minimize shadows. The resulting space is more energy efficient than before and provide a greater level of comfort for building occupants, all while protecting and preserving treasured artifacts.